Category: jrr tolkien

Maedhros Maglor

Maedhros
Maglor

© ALEF Club, Journey to The Middle-Earth Project

 So here they come. Brothers…

 So here they come. Brothers…

Maedhros
Maglor
Caranthir

© ALEF Club, Journey to The Middle-Earth Project

Maedhros Maglor

Maedhros
Maglor

© ALEF Club, Journey to The Middle-Earth Project

Maedhros at Himring waiting for his brothers. 

Maedhros at Himring waiting for his brothers. 

Maedhros

© ALEF Club, Journey to The Middle-Earth Project 

 I am your sister and not your servant,and bey…

 I am your sister and not your servant,
and beyond your bounds I will go as seems good to me.
And if you begrudge me an escort,
then I will go alone.


Aredhel
© ALEF Club, Journey to The Middle-Earth Project

Aredhel© ALEF Club, Journey to The Middle-Eart…

Aredhel
© ALEF Club, Journey to The Middle-Earth Project 

Regular

Elvish Months of the Year: August

In the High-Elven tongue, the eighth month of the year was named Úrimë (Urui being its Sindarin equivalent). Now, the root úr— comes from the Quenya word úrë, meaning ‘heat’. From this, we can conclude that Úrimë was the month of hot weather.

Regular

July—another month gone by, and with that comes a new Elvish Lesson. So in the High-elven tongue, the seventh month of the year was named Cermië (Cerveth being its Sindarin equivalent). As to the meaning of that name, there are actually surprisingly few references. However, in my research I did discover that one of the meanings of the Quenya root ‘cerm’ is ‘to give’. By this, I’m assuming that Cermië was the month of harvest or plenty (though don’t take my word for it).

As for the above picture, July always reminds me of Lothlórien somehow.

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Gríma Wormtongue: Behind the Name

In Old Norse (as well as in modern Icelandic) the word gríma refers to a ‘mask’. This is an effective name choice for the character as it serves to emphasise his treacherous and deceptive nature. He is, as a manner of speaking, hiding behind a ‘mask’, pretending to serve the King of Rohan while, in reality, working as a spy for Saruman.

On a much more obvious note, the name Wormtongue, of course, refers to a snake—often seen as the archetypal traitor throughout history, particularly in reference to the Bible. (e.g. In Genesis, it was a snake, after all, that tempted Eve into eating the Forbidden Fruit in the Garden of Eden.) In The Lord of the Rings, of course, Wormtail, very fittingly, uses his powers of speech to deceive the minds of those around him with poisonous lies (and frequently succeeds at it).

Thus, the name Gríma Wormtongue couldn’t possibly be more suited to a traitor. In his own linguistic way, Tolkien practically named him Traitor McTraitorson.

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The Lord of the Rings Is Not a Trilogy

The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien is often mistakenly called a trilogy due to the fact that it was published in three sittings. This however was not a deliberate wish on Tolkien’s part, but rather something which the original publishers decided on for economic reasons.

Following the Second World War, the UK experienced paper shortages, meaning that there was a limit to the amount of paper that each publisher could print in a year. So instead of publishing this beast of a 1000-page novel all in one sitting (which would significantly affect their quota), the original publishers Allen & Unwin decided that they would publish the book in three volumes over the course of about a year to maximise their quota. This would allow them to see how well each volume sold, thus giving them a rough idea of the existing demand.

All in all, The Lord of the Rings remains a stand-alone novel. The only reason it was split into three parts was for economic purposes. It is not nor was it ever meant as a trilogy, and Tolkien certainly never saw it as such.